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FS: Burl Walnut Veneer

edited October 10 in Classifieds

13 sheets of gorgeous walnut burl veneer
16'' x 22''
Purchased from Veneer Supplies AAA
I prefer Canadian shipping only.
Taking offers
PM me

dcibeljhollander
«1

Comments

  • You've got an email from me :)

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • Working on the Safiniea.

    squamishdrochifiside
  • I"m thinking about a black baffle also. What paint did you use?

    Don, Donno, or "Hey you" all work for me, But never "Mr Johnson"
  • edited October 10

    @rjj45 said:
    I"m thinking about a black baffle also. What paint did you use?

    Matte black

    rjj45
  • edited October 10

    ...and he never touched them again... :p

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • Strangely, I've been handling them to ensure matte stability and all is good so far. The look is fantastic. Very deep black.

  • @dcibel said:
    You've got an email from me :)

    You beat me to it! :)

  • @Gowa said:
    Working on the Safiniea.

    The people need more pictures! :)

  • I'll post a bunch when they are finished.

  • edited October 11

    I'm using this but if I had my time back I would use a different finish type, maybe Tung Oil or something similar. The veneer is much too beautiful to cover it in plastic looking stuff.

  • Danish oil then oil-poly would work well.

  • @Gowa I really disliked the Polycrylic when I tried it. Even when dry it still had a bit of haze to it. The Minwax water based poly is much better IMO if you want water based stuff, it has much better clarity, can look like a thin epoxy coat if that's what you're after.

    I'm a big fan of tung oil, I use the Circa 1850 stuff. It's super easy to apply, smells somewhat nice (IMO) and always looks great. Downside is the finishing time and cure time as you need a full 24hrs between coats and then a couple weeks to fully cure. My first coat is real heavy so I let it sit 2 days before applying a second. scuff with super fine steel wool between coats, and it can takes 4-6 coats until the wood stops soaking it up and you get an even sheen.

    rjj45
    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • Ya, the Polycrylic was a bad decision.

  • edited October 11

    Also, I used the contact cement method on one cab and the iron on wood glue method on the other. Contact cement has no issues but the wood glue had issues. When I put the first light coat of finish on the wood glue cab the veneer lifted from the substrate. I've had a heck of a time getting it in order.

  • @Gowa said:
    Also, I used the contact cement method on one cab and the iron on wood glue method on the other. Contact cement has no issues but the wood glue had issues. When I put the first light coat of finish on the wood glue cab the veneer lifted from the substrate. I've had a heck of a time getting it in order.

    I only use contact cement for my veneer work - it stinks but it works!

  • I agree

  • Use catalyzed glues that are made for veneer and there will be no issues.. ever.

    Nicholas_23Gowa
  • @Gowa said:
    Ya, the Polycrylic was a bad decision.

    Used it on one project long ago, very plastic coating.
    Now I love Tried and True oil finishes.
    You can mix their Danish Oil 50/50 with poly for a more durable finish, or just use the their oil and use your favorite poly over the top.
    https://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/

    Don, Donno, or "Hey you" all work for me, But never "Mr Johnson"
  • @R-Carpenter said:
    Use catalyzed glues that are made for veneer and there will be no issues.. ever.

    Could you please provide a name / link for a specific one? As someone who has struggled with wood glue, you definitely have my interest. The problem I always have with the wood glue iron-on method is bubbles where the glue didn't adhere.

  • @PaulEbert said:

    @R-Carpenter said:
    Use catalyzed glues that are made for veneer and there will be no issues.. ever.

    Could you please provide a name / link for a specific one? As someone who has struggled with wood glue, you definitely have my interest. The problem I always have with the wood glue iron-on method is bubbles where the glue didn't adhere.

    note: I use paper backed veneer exclusively.
    I was not happy with using Titebond II for iron on veneer - had a couple of corner and edge problems. Went back to my standard Heatlock glue, and had no problems. I almost always use 2 applications to each surface, with possibly a 3rd layer touchup aound the edges. Have not had one problem with bubbles, edges or corners in many projects. Worth the cost!
    I can't use contact cement, since my workshop is in the basement.

    Don, Donno, or "Hey you" all work for me, But never "Mr Johnson"
  • As a relative veneering novice I've also had good success with HeatLock glue. I also recommend their veneer glue roller. Tom Zarbo has a few good Youtube videos about veneering using HeatLock.

    https://veneersupplies.com/products/Better-Bond-Heat-Lock-Veneer-Glue.html

  • I've yet to see Better Bond products in Canada, so I'll be using contact cement for my next veneer adventure. I didn't have good luck with iron in method, had splitting problems with maple, the heat stress and rapid dehydration isn't a good combination for raw veneer, you'd need paper backed at the very least for iron on method I've determined.

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • @dcibel said:
    I've yet to see Better Bond products in Canada, so I'll be using contact cement for my next veneer adventure. I didn't have good luck with iron in method, had splitting problems with maple, the heat stress and rapid dehydration isn't a good combination for raw veneer, you'd need paper backed at the very least for iron on method I've determined.

    Yeah, that's what I've heard about raw veneer. Gotta use contact cement or a cold press method.
    My local hard wood shop has offered to do a cold press workup with some raw bubinga they have in
    stock. Going to try that one of these days.

    Don, Donno, or "Hey you" all work for me, But never "Mr Johnson"
  • FYI look at the reactivation temperatures. I use the Tite bond original yellow for iron on and vacuum bagging
    http://www.webherrera.com/blog/2009/04/19/titebonds-franklin-internationals-iron-on-instructions/

     John H, thanks to JP I did get that email
  • @PaulEbert said:

    @R-Carpenter said:
    Use catalyzed glues that are made for veneer and there will be no issues.. ever.

    Could you please provide a name / link for a specific one? As someone who has struggled with wood glue, you definitely have my interest. The problem I always have with the wood glue iron-on method is bubbles where the glue didn't adhere.

    https://www.vacupress.com/product/unibond-800-1-gallon-liquid-resin/
    Unibond 800 for any sort of burls and veneers that are prone to movement.

    https://www.vacupress.com/product/unibond-one-1-gallon/

    1 is good for easy straight grain veneers that move less. I use both.

    https://www.qualityvak.com/glue.html?gclid=CjwKCAjw_Y_8BRBiEiwA5MCBJoj717LVi-Ko-KrZTOI_8P4C7ZrSD-iB71e2ktsLyv92jm32ZdzMehoCRcwQAvD_BwE

    This one is sort of industry standard. Very rigid glue line. Mixed with water by weight.

  • Well, after some disappointment in the quality of finish, I've decided to strip (sand) the Polycrylic from the cab and apply another type of finish. To further my disappointment, the Polycrylic doesn't sand like other finishes. It balls up in small plastic balls and clogs the sandpaper. This stuff is pure crap. It looks like crap and the workability is awful.
    As you can see in the picture, the residue from the Polycrylic stays white even when wiped with a cloth or coated with another coat of Polycrylic.

    Minwax needs to go back to the drawing board on this one.
    This is not my first rodeo. In the past, I always used contact cement and Verathane or oiled. I will continue this in future projects.
    It will be a heavy job to remove all the Minwack, but I'm determined to bring out this stellar veneer the best I can.

    joeybutts
  • If you have some extra test material I suggest you try Dave Fred's technique. I have been using it now for a year or two and love the results. It's the 1:1:1 mix of boiled linseed oil, turpentine, and either gloss or satin oil based poly. Downside is that the turpentine makes the mixture stink! Upside is the fool-proof-ness and most importantly the final results!

  • edited October 13

    I'm kinda stuck in this now and I will follow it through. Here's hoping my patience holds out.
    By the way, that flat black paint is amazing. I like it a lot.

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