Please review the site Rules, Terms of Service, and Privacy Policy at your convenience. Rules, TOS, Privacy
Get familiar with the reaction system: Introducing the Reaction System

Test instruments and rigs - share them here!

I know we periodically share our various test rigs - but in another thread it was commented that it might be fun to share our various testing rigs etc.

I am at work currently, so no pictures of my various test rigs but tonight I can upload some pictures of the various speaker design tools I use - plus some other odds and ends I have bought over the years to measure various things.

I have a signature.

Comments

  • edited February 11

    ...and in this drawer I have various lengths of wire... :)

    I have old Omnimic V1 and EMM-6, though the calibration provided for EMM-6 is bogus, mine was pretty darn flat without any calibration. I did make my own cal file using Omnimic as reference, so at the very least both my mics measure the same.

    ARTA and SoundEasy, leaning far over to ARTA/VituixCAD for measurement and design instead of old clunky and often incorrect SE.

    I've shared my ARTA jig in the other jig thread, but here's another photo of it. I use it with a Steinberg UR22mkii USB interface which I rather like.


    That's all I really need for speaker measurement and design. For any electronics work, I have a Weller WTCPT iron, I really like it because it doesn't need calibration, but you do have to buy different tips if you want a different temperature. It has magic magnetic action that self regulates. For all the DIY work I've done I've only ever had 2 tips, a 700 and an 800 degree standard one.

    Also have a Philips PM3394 scope. Technically not mine but the owner left it with me to use. I've got another more basic Techtronics analog scope too but it's way out of calibration.

    Function generator? Got an app for that - Keuwlsoft Dual Channel Function Generator.

    Bench supply? Nope, got a variac around here somewhere, a breadboard and a rectifier and some caps in a bin if I really need. Also some fancy medical grade DC SMPS modules, Emerson LPS203-M, 12VDC with a lot of current capability, and can wire 2 of them together for +/-12VDC.

    Multimeter - Fluke 179 that I carry for work, and a Wavetek 15XL POS that doesn't auto-range but it's accurate enough and was free.

    Of course, this nerd light comes in real handy too.

    rjj45
    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • "old clunky and often incorrect SE"?

  • edited February 12

    Serious question? It's old, it's slow and clunky, every new release fixes 10 errors and introduces 5 more. I've had lengthy discussion with the developer about various issues - how the software loads invalid data if you don't have the X axis scale set just right for the file in question, issues that really should not exist period, let alone the fact that "loading invalid data" is considered normal operation. But it's the users fault for not doing it right. RTFM.

    My last design with AMT, I questioned the wild difference between off-axis simulation and reality with a non-dome tweeter. Developer says "don't have a ribbon so I never tested it". Had to provide real world measurements so he could fix the math.

    It's always treated baffle diffraction as a gain rather than a loss, which is incorrect, developer refuses to admit and fix a simple math error, instead wrote a paper with some incorrect terminology to explain how the software doesn't make any sense. Much "theory" applied without real world testing and experience. I think it's clear that the developer hasn't used the software in years.

    I could go on...Anyway, in my arguments with the SE developer, I looked at VituixCAD for comparison, liked what it did and decided just to move over and start using it instead. (FWIW it accurately represents ribbon off-axis and baffle step from 2pi to 4pi is properly treated as a loss). ARTA was the natural next step.

    Sorry.. Off topic rant, he started it :)

    kenrhodesrjj45
    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • Yes it was a serious question. Thank you for your detailed reply. I had been considering purchasing a new, more powerful laptop and SE. I am second guessing that now.

  • 'Soundeasy'; the everpresent audio oxymoron.

  • edited February 12

    @PWRRYD If you want to go down a more advanced design path, I'd recommend ARTA and VituixCAD over SoundEasy. ARTA can do all the same measurements and VituixCAD includes similar design elements, you won't be missing anything important using these tools over SoundEasy, and will be a lot less frustrated and confused overall.

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • I have never used Soundeasy. I have Praxis for measurements as long as I can keep a Windows XP computer up and running. I have thought at some point SE would be useful to attempt full crossover emulation as I have an 8 channel amp (QSC CX168) that would be perfect for that.

    For design work, I have been pretty impressed with VituixCAD. One does have to do a lot of measurements to get the most out of it.

    Keep an open mind, but don't let your brain fall out.

    Sehlin Sound Solutions
  • edited February 12

    One has to take a lot of measurements to get the most out of any design - VituixCAD is just a tool that enables the use of those extra measurements well. You can feed it just on-axis response and get the same basic functionality of Xsim as well if that's all you want. I really like that VituixCAD will optimize response by the power response or listening window which actually isn't available in SoundEasy, and I don't really trust the results of SoundEasy for power response and directivity index, only looking at a single axis and only 180 degrees of information doesn't seem to follow standard conventions.

    SoundEasy's biggest selling feature is the fact that it can simulate an analog crossover digitally without having to build it. The way it works is fairly cumbersome though, you can't just play the music stored on your computer through the digital filter. It basically turns your entire PC into a DSP, so you have to feed it audio from an external source through the input, PC processes through the designed transfer function and then out.

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • edited February 13

    I currently am revamping/reorganizing my electronic work area, so here are a couple of pics of gear just laying around. I'll post a picture of my tiny work area in a week or so when it's back together.




    Of course I have the usual assortment of handheld DMM's, a couple clamp meters, a tenma lcr meter, and a peak semiconductor tester.
    As far as speaker stuff, two wt3's, dats, two onmimic's and a umik-1 that was calibrated by Cross Spectrum Labs. I tried to have them calibrate one of the omnimic's, but I gave up on getting a reply after several attempts, actually I got a reply after multiple emails and about three to four weeks of waiting, stating a price and to let them know if I was interested, which I promptly did several times to no avail. So what I'm getting at here is I calibrated my omnimic off of the umik. Sorry for taking the long way to the point. I have nothing against Cross Spectrum Labs, they do fantastic work, and I realize that this is just a side gig for them, just sharing my reasoning for home calibration.

    rjj45jhollanderScottS
  • edited February 13

    That's quite the collection! I'd love to have one of those newer Rigol scopes, takes up much less space than the big chonker that I have.

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • The Rigol is fairly new to me, so I really haven't gotten into all the things its capable of, and I'm not as comfortable with it as the old analog scope, but you are correct about the size, its small and lightweight. I think the agilent 34401a is heavier.

  • @dcibel said:
    One has to take a lot of measurements to get the most out of any design - VituixCAD is just a tool that enables the use of those extra measurements well. You can feed it just on-axis response and get the same basic functionality of Xsim as well if that's all you want. I really like that VituixCAD will optimize response by the power response or listening window which actually isn't available in SoundEasy, and I don't really trust the results of SoundEasy for power response and directivity index, only looking at a single axis and only 180 degrees of information doesn't seem to follow standard conventions.

    SoundEasy's biggest selling feature is the fact that it can simulate an analog crossover digitally without having to build it. The way it works is fairly cumbersome though, you can't just play the music stored on your computer through the digital filter. It basically turns your entire PC into a DSP, so you have to feed it audio from an external source through the input, PC processes through the designed transfer function and then out.

    VituixCAD can output transfer functions that, I believe, can be imported into an outboard DSP for a quick listen of the modeled xo. This may not be much more trouble than the similar function in SE from what you're saying. I continue to be impressed with what VituixCAD offers, and for free!

  • edited February 14

    Yes, well you can design biquads for some specific DSP systems like miniDSP for example, and active filters as well with VituixCAD but you are going to have to rebuild a replica transfer function of the analog filter, which will take some time and may never be a perfect replication. Of course, you could always build DSP filters to try and replicate the designed transfer function, a simple measurement through ARTA can provide the exact transfer function that the DSP provides so you can adjust it with live feedback.

    The benefit that SoundEasy has is to simply produce the transfer function of a designed analog filter digitally with just a click of a button, exactly as designed, but as I explained the physical setup to listen to it can be a bit cumbersome.

    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening.
  • @ugly_woofer said:
    I currently am revamping/reorganizing my electronic work area, so here are a couple of pics of gear just laying around.

    I had a very similar collection until this spring. When my son moved home from college at the start of the pandemic, we decided to give him the spare bedroom in the basement as an e-learning/bachelor pad area. That meant, I had to move a lot of my audio stuff to an area in our storage room, clearing out a bunch of less-used stuff in the process. That included 2 frequency counters, an old Tektronix o-scope, a harmonic distortion analyzer, and a function generator, along with some vintage amps, preamps, receivers.

    Keep an open mind, but don't let your brain fall out.

    Sehlin Sound Solutions
Sign In or Register to comment.